Having a child can be the most joyous of occasions but it can also be one of the most hectic and expensive. We are more fortunate than our parents and theirs before them in that we have some great technological advancements that make parenting a lot easier.

Washing machines, powdered milk, designer push chairs and baby monitors can make parenting far less of a chore than what our parent had to endure. However, some technologies and advancements come with a price.

Disposable nappies may save us bundles of time and hassle when it comes to changing babies but they are quite expensive products and are environmentally damaging too. Disposable nappies account for nearly five percent of all household waste and as they can’t be recycle and take ages to degraded they linger around in land fills for years. They are very expensive too with the cost of nappies for a new born baby can reach easily be in excess of several thousand pounds.

However, is going back to using washable nappies really as troublesome as we may imagine? Well disposable nappies need not be any more hassle than disposables – the baby still has to be changed and as the washing machine does most of the hard work it is really just a case of storing the dirty nappies in a nappy bin until it’s time to wash them.

A good quality nappy bin is essential for this. Not only can dirty nappies be extremely unsightly they can of course smell so a good sized nappy bin – and the size will depend on how often you get round to washing them – with a decent lid will ensure the nappies are kept out of sight and smell, until they are washed.

There is no need to wash the nappies from the nappy bin at extreme temperatures either. Even soiled nappy will get clean at normal wash temperatures, especially with modern machines and washing powders.

By returning to washable nappies not only can you help reduce waste on the environment but you may also save a packet too – as the only outlay is a good quality nappy bin.

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